The Wall Street Journal Does it Again


Really? I mean who gets their information about the efficacy of exercise from the Wall Street Journal?  People who need some justification for not exercising?  “100 Miles on the Bike? Might as Well Play Golf” (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324481204578177563340721582.html) is yet another contentiously titled “article” by Kevin Helliker about the efficacy of endurance exercise.  Again, like his recent “One Running Shoe in the Grave,” the concerns and claims pointed out by the research in no way merit the ridiculous title of the WSJ article.  Stop doing this.  The confidence of the article’s title in no way reflects the rather moderate claims of the scientists on which Helliker’s article is based.  The research used by the article cited by Helliker to support what seems to be a weekly diatribe against exercise is based on a study of the mortality records of 9,889 athletes who competed in the Olympic Games between 1896 and 1936.  Yes, you read that right.  I’m not even sure that more needs to be said.  I am, however, increasingly interested in why the Wall Street Journal feels that it needs to be the point man on weekly reminding readers that exercise is bad for you. Good grief – give it a rest. Finally, what is it about Helliker’s insistence in adding several topically-unrelated paragraphs at the end of his articles? This time he decides to quote a blogger about how extreme exercise induces euphoria.   It’s a mess – keep playing golf WSJ readers.

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One comment on “The Wall Street Journal Does it Again

  1. Anonymous says:

    Seriously? You mean, using a study of athletes during the heyday of “true amateurism” (and foreshortened longevity due to a host of things like the Spanish Flu, a couple of World Wars), he’s deciding we should all just cut out early and golf.

    Not to be cynical or anything, but I would think it obvious why the nation’s foremost business magazine wants people to be anxious, unhealthy, and sedate. When you’re giving your own life purpose and taking pleasure in personal accomplishments, developing rich social networks through your sport, and spending time unplugged…do you really need what they are selling?

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